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Willamette Valley/Metro – Starting with the Columbia, the news remains a bit glum right now, with dam passage still so to go. Managers pulled the plug on the standard mid-May summer steelhead opener, we’d likely catch more spring Chinook than summer steelhead right now. Couple that with the need to pass more Chinook over Bonneville Dam, and Houston, we have a problem. Stay tuned but we’ll get a fishing report reprieve from the Columbia for the foreseeable future. You can view the damaging press release here.

The Willamette River however is a good place to be! Following a blistering Oregon City fishery late last week, the action remained fairly fair near Oregon City on the Thursday opener. Eggs remain a good option in the swifter flows, while hardware is taking on a life of its own in the warming waters. Trollers working the water downstream of Oregon City are certainly coming across some spring Chinook, but the action has shifted to the kegging point near Oregon City. Sea lions dominate the scene above the West Linn Bridge, it remains barren of angler effort.

The Sandy and Clackamas are starting to kick off a few spring Chinook, and I do mean a few. Summer steelhead are even more rare. Anglers are investing most of their time in the mainstem Willlamette, when it’s open for business. River levels remain a bit high, but fishable.

With the season’s first shot of spring Chinook over Willamette Falls, anglers upstream of the falls are finding some action. The large school that crossed last last week remain pretty bunched up so you’ll have to follow the bite upstream if you have lofty goals. At least the moss hasn’t become a problem… yet.

The upper Willamette, Santiams and McKenzie report is unavailable this week, due to writer Michael Teague being on medical leave for a short period of time.

Northwest – Anglers took advantage of the soft tide series last weekend, targeting Tillamook Bay spring Chinook in the lower estuary. Not many people were doing it however, but there were some quality fish taken here recently. We’re heading into a stronger tide series, which makes the upper bay more appealing to spinner and herring trollers. This is traditionally when the season starts to get underway.

District rivers also have fish, but sparse in number. The Trask remains the top prospect, especially near the hatchery, but we should start to see more biters in the Wilson and Nestucca Rivers here shortly.

Charter boats were wise to cancel their halibut trips on the May 11th opener. There’s no sign of friendly seas in the foreseeable future. That’ll put bottomfishing, ocean crabbing and salmon fishing on hold for a bit longer.

And just to add insult to injury, razor clam digging remains closed along the entire Oregon Coast.

Oh, why not add a poor showing of spring Chinook in the terminal areas of the lower Columbia. Young’s Bay and Blind Slough remain futile for sport anglers.

A busy week of trout stocking here however. Go here to find the district’s schedule.

Southwest – A SW region report is unavailable this week, due to writer Michael Teague on medical leave for a short period of time.

Eastern – An Eastern Oregon report is unavailable this week, due to writer Michael Teague on medical leave for a short period of time.

SW Washington – The big news for district anglers was the lighting up of the Drano Lake fishery. Rumor has it, Sunday was nothing short of a bloodbath. One might expect that given the recent dam passage, but look for action to slow, as passage has. The Wind River fishery is performing fairly as well.

The Cowlitz River check was a bit pathetic at 98 bank rods with 6 adult Chinook kept. 26 boat rods with 3 adult and 1 jack Chinook kept.

The Lewis and Kalama Rivers are not good prospects, but the Lewis River spring Chinook return has slightly surpassed the predicted return to date.

Razor clam season is closed for the year, but shellfish managers will look at options again in late summer, in hopes for a fall opportunity.