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Willamette Valley/Metro – The big news is, the Columbia is re-opening after a 2-month hiatus. Be sure to check regulations here if you’re fishing the mainstem Columbia. Hatchery salmon and steelhead is open, but sturgeon closed effective on Wednesday. There will be no estuary sturgeon opener this Saturday.

The Willamette is also open 7-days per week now, although the bulk of the run has gone through. Effort remains low, but some anglers are unlocking the late season secrets (I’m not one of them) and finding some success. Stray summer Chinook should start to show in the lower Multnomah Channel and around the head of the channel too. This is a common occurrence in high water years. Shad fishing has been slow in the Oregon City area since the sun disappeared.

The Sandy remains challenging although some summer steelhead and springers are falling to small spinners in the upper reaches below Cedar Creek.

The Clackamas is starting to produce a few spring Chinook, but anglers still have to work hard for them. Summer steelhead remain the better option, but better numbers of Chinook are sure to show in the coming weeks.

Northwest – Spring Chinook fishermen remain largely disappointed in Tillamook Bay action. As we’ve mentioned before, some of the best fishing of the season happened in late June and into July last year, we’re all holding out hope for that to happen again this year.

River anglers have been equally disgruntled, but with a fresh shot of rain, enthusiasm will be on the rise again, and a fresh batch of spring Chinook should be available in the Trask and summer steelhead and a few spring Chinook in the Nestucca and Wilson Rivers.

The nearshore halibut fishery is producing a rare fish, and the ocean was a bit rough for anglers to enjoy the all-depth opener today. It’s very likely anglers will get to enjoy more options in the coming weeks as we’re far from attaining the quota.

Ocean crabbing has picked up a little bit and bay crabbing is fair. Bottomfishing remains excellent and some nice lings are coming from the nearshore.

Southwest – From Pete Heley at PeteHeley.com – As of the last halibut opener for our central coast subarea (June 1st – 3rd) 80,382 pounds of the 151,712 pound spring quota had been caught and 71,330 pounds, or 47 percent of the quota still remains.

With much better weather during the last two openers, Bandon has accounted for 7,806 pounds and compares favorably with Newport on a per angler basis. The next all-depth spring halibut opener for our area is scheduled for June 15th – 17th and may not be a full three-day opener dependent upon the poundage caught during the June 8th through 10th opener.

Trout plants along the Oregon coast have been discontinued and will resume on a very limited basis in October.

The redtailed surfperch or “pinkfin” fishery on the lower Umpqua River above Winchester Bay is becoming more consistent. Pat Jones, one of our South Jetty’s most successful lingcod anglers reported consistent lingcod limits over the last few weeks.

The few anglers fishing the ocean for salmon are enjoying limited success and fall chinook salmon will start entering the Umpqua River around the first of July. July 1st is when anglers are required to mark their Umpqua River chinooks as fall run fish instead of spring run fish.

The North Umpqua has been fair for spring chinook recently, but that fishery will close on June 30th.

As for our local bass and panfish waters, high water on the road to Horsfall Beach continues to make access to Horsfall Lake difficult.

The water level at Beale Lake, which normally covers 130 acres when full, is higher than normal and it is still easy to move back and forth between the lake’s three sections.

The Loon Lake bluegill bite continues to be red hot. One angler who regularly fishes Fords Pond in Sutherlin stated that largemouth bass anglers fishing with Senkos were enjoying the best success and a few of the incidentally caught crappies measured all of 12-inches.

The smallmouth bass in Woahink Lake completed their spawn and quickly moved back into much deeper water, but a few of the largemouth bass are still shallow.

Tenmile Lake bassfishing has been good, but panfishing has been terrible. Part of the “lack of panfish” problem might be the tournament-based bass regulations which ensures that the lake has an artificially high population of larger bass.

Pete Heley works weekends at the Stockade Market & Tackle, across from ‘A’ Dock, in Winchester Bay where he is more than happy to swap fishing info with anyone.

Eastern – Local angler Tim Moran reports:

John Day is now at about 2000 CFS….the temperature is climbing and with the nice weather next week it should fish well from Monument to Cottonwood. Last week it was still a bit high which makes for great floating but only good fishing.  We manged around 30 bass a day and this time the color was brown for both flies and plastics.

The Deschutes River is empty and fishing is pretty good!   Not much in the way of dry fly fishing with all the wind and rain last week but nymphing was good with all the usual suspects like pheasant tails, copper johns.

The Cascade Lakes are fishing good.  Reports are that trout are making a comeback at Davis and some big ones have been landed there recently fishing damsel nymphs.  The bass fishing is hit or miss based on the weather.

Davis is full this year so there are lots of under water reeds so use heavier leaders or those bigger bass will wrap you and break you off as I learned the hard way yesterday.

Crane Prairie is giving up some nice fish to the fly guys fishing leech patterns while trollers are getting fish with worms behind a flasher or small flatfish.

Kokanee fishing is holding up at Odell.  As the weather warms the fish will head deeper.  Your electronics will be your friend in the coming weeks as you look for the schools in 30 to 50 feet of water.

From ODF&W:

OWYHEE RESERVOIR: The Owyhee Reservoir is currently at 100 percent of capacity and irrigation season has commenced so managers have lowered the flows below the dam and there is not another influx of water anticipated. Crappie fishing has been great these past weeks with anglers catching them throughout the reservoir and especially around the state park and day use area. Recent reports indicate that a lot of the bass have already spawned and that bass fishing has been slow at times when the wind and rain have pushed them into deeper water.

Look for bass and crappie around submerged rocks and other structures. In the past, when there has been a prolonged drought followed by the reservoir filling up, the bass fishery has often been stunted and some bass have experienced die-offs. This may be attributed to the burning of energy reserves during spawning activities followed by a lack of forage available caused by the inundation of water.

The Hines ODFW office and warm water biologists from Salem will be sampling the reservoir this month to assess the warmwater fishery in Owyhee Reservoir to monitor any changes attributed to the drought and subsequent filling of the reservoir. The results of the sampling will be reported in the weekly Recreation Report.

SW Washington – From WDF&W:

Cowlitz River – 258 bank rods kept 27 adult and 1 jack spring Chinook and 3 steelhead and released 1 steelhead and 1 cutthroat. 29 boat rods kept 15 steelhead and released 1 cutthroat. Last week, Tacoma Power employees recovered 357 spring Chinook adults, 27 spring Chinook jacks and 33 summer run steelhead adults in five days of operation at the Cowlitz Salmon Hatchery separator.

River flows at Mayfield Dam are approximately 6,200 cubic feet per second on Monday, June 12. Water visibility is seven feet and water temperature is 50 degrees F.

Cowlitz River from boundary markers at the mouth upstream to the Lexington Drive Bridge/Sparks Road Bridge – Effective June 16 through July 31 and September 1 through October 31, only 1 hatchery steelhead may be retained. From August 1 through August 31, release all steelhead.  Effective June 16 through October 31, night closure in effect except for anglers enrolled in the Pikeminnow Sport-Reward Program and actively fishing for pikeminnow.

Kalama River – 29 bank anglers kept 1 adult and 2 jack spring Chinook and released 3 adult spring Chinook. 13 boat anglers kept 1 adult and 1 jack spring Chinook.

Lewis River – 4 bank rods had no catch. 4 boat anglers kept 1 adult spring Chinook. Lewis River from the mouth upstream to the mouth of the East Fork Lewis – Effective June 16 through July 31 and September 1 through October 31, only 1 hatchery steelhead may be retained. From August 1 through August 31, release all steelhead.  Effective June 16 through October 31, night closure in effect except for anglers enrolled in the Pikeminnow Sport-Reward Program and actively fishing for pikeminnow.

North Fork Lewis River – 28 bank rods had no catch. 18 boat rods also had no catch. Wind River from the mouth (boundary line markers) upstream to 400 feet below Shipherd Falls – Little to no effort for spring Chinook.  Effective June 16 through July 31 and September 1 through October 31, only 1 hatchery steelhead may be retained. From August 1 through August 31, release all steelhead.  Effective June 16 through October 31, night closure in effect except for anglers enrolled in the Pikeminnow Sport-Reward Program and actively fishing for pikeminnow.

Drano Lake – 22 boat rods kept 2 adult and 2 jack spring Chinook and released 1 adult and 1 jack spring Chinook.  Effective June 16 through July 31 and October 1 through October 31, only 1 hatchery steelhead may be retained. From August 1 through September 30, release all steelhead.  Effective June 16 through October 31, night closure in effect except for anglers enrolled in the Pikeminnow Sport-Reward Program and actively fishing for pikeminnow.

White Salmon River from the mouth upstream to the county road bridge below the former location of the powerhouse – No report on angling success.  Effective June 16 through July 31 and September 1 through October 31, only 1 hatchery steelhead may be retained.  Effective August 1 through August 31, release all steelhead.  Effective June 16 through October 31, night closure in effect except for anglers enrolled in the Pikeminnow Sport-Reward Program and actively fishing for pikeminnow.

Klickitat River – 28 bank anglers kept 11 adult and 2 jack spring Chinook and 2 steelhead. Lower Columbia River mainstem from the Megler-Astoria Bridge upstream to the Hwy. 395 Bridge at Pasco – Currently closed to fishing for salmon and steelhead. Effective June 16 through July 31, the salmon and steelhead daily limit is 6 fish of which no more than 2 may be adult salmon or 1 adult salmon and 1 hatchery steelhead. For salmon, only hatchery Chinook or any sockeye may be retained. Sockeye count towards the adult daily limit. Effective June 16 through December 31, night closure in effect except for anglers enrolled in the Pikeminnow SportReward Program and actively fishing for pikeminnow.

From the mouth upstream to the Dalles Dam – Release all STEELHEAD August 1 through August 31. From The Dalles Dam upstream to John Day Dam – Release all STEELHEAD September 1 through September 31. From John Day Dam upstream to McNary Dam – Release all STEELHEAD September 1 through October 31. From McNary Dam upstream to the Hwy. 395 Bridge – Release all STEELHEAD October 1 through November 31.