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The Buoy 10 fishery is about to kick off! Do you have your technical reports? Go to our Tech Report Web Page and order yours today! While your there, you may as well pick up a few more tech reports of your favorite fisheries! You have a lot of money tied up in your equipment, it may be time to invest in your success!

Here’s just a sample of the Buoy 10 technical report, the entire report is a whopping 4,400 words with several detailed graphics to help you catch more fish! Order yours TODAY!

The Guide’s Forecast – Technical Report Series

Technical Report #4 – Columbia River Estuary Salmon Fishing for the Bank and Boat Angler

Introduction

It is estimated that at one time the Columbia River had returns of salmon somewhere between 13 and 17 million wild fish. Although the river in its current state may see returns of 2 million fish on a good year, it is still the strongest fishery for salmon in the lower 48 states! The river has enjoyed healthy returns of hatchery (and some wild) salmon in the late 1990’s through 2001 and hopefully for the next several years to come. The first place these fish become available to the sport angler is the mouth of the Columbia River near Astoria. This area, known as the estuary, will be defined in this report as the river between Buoy 10 on the bar upstream to Tongue Point on the Oregon side. Over 100,000 angler trips were logged for Oregon and Washington anglers in the Lower Columbia River (Bonneville Dam downstream) in 1998. And this is with a short Buoy 10 season! Anyone that has ever fished here knows the excitement this fishery brings with it. The purpose of this tech report is to make you a more effective salmon angler in the estuary using techniques the anglers use that fish there the most- fishing guides. Listed here are tried and proven techniques that have worked well for Columbia River Guides and will produce well for anglers willing to adopt these techniques. Regulations for this fishery will be adopted in April so keep yourself informed by logging onto The Guide’s Forecast and subscribing to our newsletter. It can be accessed by going to: http://www.theguidesforecast.com.

Run Timing

This area of the Columbia River becomes a different scene starting in mid-August. The coastal towns at the mouth become the temporary homes of thousands of motor homes and boats as anglers from around the country flock to this popular destination. Although the first spurt of salmon doesn’t always make a consistent show from year to year, it is safe to assume that the salmon start to show in force around the 15th of August. In 1999, there was a night and day difference between August 16th and August 17th. It was just like someone opened a gate and let all the salmon in the river. When they decide to show, they show in force! Chinook enter the river a little earlier than coho. The peak chinook fishing will take place between August 15th to August 31st. There will be catchable numbers of chinook in the lower river into the first week of September. Then the coho will make their strong showing. The coho start in force about the 3rd week of August and become a consistent part of the catch around the last week of August through the first 2 weeks of September. Good numbers of coho were available even earlier in 2001 due to an exceptional run size. There seems to be a little lull in activity but when the 3rd week of September comes around, action gets hot again for several days. All you have to do is keep your eyes on The Guide’s Forecast to know when it is happening. Now let’s look at the most productive area to catch these fish in the estuary:

From Buoy 10, Upstream

Buoy 10 is probably the most popular place to fish for salmon in the estuary. This buoy is located at the mouth of the Columbia. It is also the westerly boundary for the river fishery. This area is most productive…

Buoy 14- Just upstream from buoy 10, this spot can produce sporadic action. This is usually the first place I stop…

“Red Line” – This is the term used for the string of red buoys that mark the south edge of the shipping channel…

The Can Formally Known as “Yellow”- This buoy used to mark a dredge dump spot. We did not see the buoy in the 2001 season. There is an underwater spoil that makes a shallow spot. In the 2000 season…

The Tunnel – This tunnel is seen from the water on the Washington side. It is right off of Chinook Point in Fort Columbia State Park. It is more of a location indicator than an actual spot to fish…

The Church – Like the tunnel, this is another location indicator as you are trolling downstream with the current…

Desdemona Sands – This is the giant sandbar that stretches from just upstream…

Lower Columbia River- below Astoria Bridge

The Bridge – This is the Astoria/Megler Bridge. You will see heavy concentrations of boats fishing the Washington side in the deep channel. Notice that they are not under the highest expansions of the bridge. It seems that the fish prefer the expansion sections to the south side of the highest ones. The most productive time to fish this area is…

Salmon trolling area above bridge

High Tide Bridge Pocket – This area is just downstream of the bridge in the shallower water (16 – 20 foot) against Desdemona Sands on the Washington side. It seems most productive as you get closer to high slack. When the tide finally does slack out…

Above Bridge, Washington Side – Another popular spot that even though it gets a lot of use, there is room up here to fish. Like the downstream stretch below the bridge, this upstream stretch…

Saw Dust Pile to Hammond – This stretch of water can be very productive at times. It is a good place to fish when the winds are bad on the north side for a couple of reasons. First, you are close to the boat basin and…

This is just a sample of the Buoy 10 technical report, the entire report is a whopping 4,400 words with several detailed graphics to help you catch more fish!  Order yours today – Columbia River Estuary Salmon Fishing for the Bank and Boat Angler or  Or take a look at all our reports!