Oregon and SW Washington Fisheries Update November 22nd, 2019

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Willamette Valley/Metro – With little going on in the basin, folks are looking for opportunities to the west, but those opportunities too are on the wane.

Coho passage at Willamette Falls is but a trickle and the catch and release fishery for sturgeon in the Portland Harbor doesn’t seem to draw much interest, at least this time of year.

Coho on the Clackamas largely consists of darkening wild coho, the hatchery run is over here.

Pro guide Jeff Stoeger (503-704-7920) of O2BFISHN reports on the Sandy River, “This week’s Sandy River report has the coho fishing slowly winding down. There is fish still coming into the river that are still bright but the number of fish has dropped off. You will find fish throughout the entire river from the mouth all the way up to the Salmon River. Fish that past the hatchery are wild fish that are heading up to the upper river to spawn and should be left alone. Most of the guys are fishing Oxbow to the hatchery with most of the new fish being wild fish. There is still some hatchery fish that are stacking up at Cedar Creek and at Dodge Park area. When your out walking the river banks, please make sure not to walk on new redds that the spawning fish have laid, you can tell a redd by the color of gravel that looks like it has been cleaned and it has mound shape look. You will see a lot of fish spawning from the lower river to the upper Salmon River.”

See the full version of Jeff’s, Tim’s and Bob’ reports by becoming a paid subscriber here. It’s just $0.50 cents per week!

More TROUT STOCKING of both legals and trophy trout in the Willamette Valley and throughout the state. Fall is a great time to take advantage of these fish that are wanting to put on some winter pounds before the weather hits.

Northwest Oregon – With interest and the fall Chinook run winding down on the north coast, anglers will eagerly await the district’s winter steelhead run, which is still months away from productivity. Tillamook will remain the best option, but the late run is not showing in any great numbers.

The most recent rain freshet did bring rivers up almost a foot from their near summer-low status, which is obviously quite odd for mid-November. Chinook, chum and coho had been stacking up in the tidewater reaches of many north coast streams, but given the scarcity of the late run Chinook in the Wilson and Kilchis, action was far from impressive although some quality fall Chinook were taken.

The Nehalem, Salmon, Nestucca, Alsea, Siletz and Yaquina systems are largely over although a few wild coho are still coming in. Many would say there was certainly more wild coho that predicted for the north Oregon Coast. Crabbing remains good in most north coast estuaries. It helps that we haven’t had a significant rain freshet for quite some time. Ocean crabbing opens on December 1st, but ocean weather for the foreseeable future is not conducive to salt water fishing.

Here’s a couple of LARGE sea bass taken on KastKing’s Hot Shot 8’2” strike tip rod during a Veteran’s Day fishing excursion (Veterans, thank you for your service!) on the sunken jetty out of Astoria, we had our 20-fish limit in about 45 minutes of fishing:

Get this rod and other dependable KastKing products just in time for drifting our north coast rivers for Chinook and steelhead in the coming weeks. Go HERE for some of the finest products available to Pacific Northwest anglers!

Another KastKing testament as to the versatility and resilience of the KastKing Krome series rod developed by Al Noraker for our favorite sportfish of the Pacific Northwest. Bob Rees reports, “Year 2, and I have yet to break a rod! KastKing’s Krome series is THE BEST fishing rod I’ve ever had in my hands. Two years of sturgeon after sturgeon, Chinook after Chinook and lingcod, steelhead and seabass too. The versatility and durability of KastKing rods is undeniable!”

Want Thanksgiving or Christmas crab? With the delay in the commercial crabbing season, awesome crabbing in the lower Columbia and possibly the ocean (starting December 1st and weather dependent) should remain EXCELLENT!

Call Bob Rees now (503-812-9036) or email (brees@pacifier.com) to reserve your seats! ($85/person for 1-5 people, $75/person for a group of 6)

Central and Eastern Oregon Fishing ReportsFrom Avid Angler Tim Moran

Lower Deschutes River –  Fishing has been up and down with the temps.  When it reaches into the 50’s fishing has been good on nymphs and dries when a hatch breaks out. 

John Day River – Believe it or not, I still know of a hardcore Smallmouth fisherman who is getting fish in the river mouth and along the Columbia.  There are steelhead available in this stretch too.

Metolius River – The Met is a go-to river for late fall and winter fishing.  There are big Bull Trout always lurking.

Fall River – Fall fishes well in the late fall and it’s a little easier when there is a little chop on the water so this could be a great weekend to hit it. Might even get to fish in some picturesque snow!

Crooked River – Another go-to for fall and winter fishing.  As long as the river levels are consistent this river will fish well. 

Cascade Lakes – some of the Cascade lakes that are open were fishing well last week.  A thin layer of ice came off of Hosmer and fishing was great!  It may freeze up again but watch the freezing level and hit it if you get a window. 

Probably going to be a bit cold with flurries but you won’t catch anything on the couch! 

Central and Eastern Oregon Fishing ReportsFrom ODF&W

The Friday and Saturday after Thanksgiving are Free Fishing Days in Oregon – days you don’t need a license or tag to fish, crab or clam anywhere in the state open to fishing/crabbing/clamming. (Remember, all other rules and regulations apply.)

Steelhead anglers on the lower Deschutes should concentrate on the Maupin to Warm Springs section.

Trout anglers can target the Crooked, lower Deschutes and Metolius rivers, where fishing for native redbands can be good throughout the year.

The Friday and Saturday after Thanksgiving are Free Fishing Days in Oregon – days you don’t need a license or tag to fish, crab or clam anywhere in the state open to fishing/crabbing/clamming. (Remember, all other rules and regulations apply.)

Steelhead are starting to move into the John Day River – anglers should focus their attention of lower parts of the river.

As water temperatures cool in Willow Creek Reservoir, trout move into the shallows and get more active – anglers can do well fishing PowerBait from shore.

The Friday and Saturday after Thanksgiving are Free Fishing Days in Oregon – days you don’t need a license or tag to fish, crab or clam anywhere in the state open to fishing/crabbing/clamming. (Remember, all other rules and regulations apply.)

Cottonwood Meadows, Spaulding, Big Rock and Lofton lakes are good choices for some great fall trout fishing.

Best bet in the Klamath Basin is fishing below Keno Dam or the Powerhouse on the Klamath River.

Southwest – From ODF&W

Bottomfishing is now open to fish at all depths. Fishing for lingcod and rockfish was very good this past weekend. Many anglers caught big lingcod while fishing out past 40 fathoms. The daily bag limit for marine fish is 5 plus 2 lingcod.

The harvest of cabezon along with copper, quillback, and China rockfish are now all closed to boat anglers. Shore anglers will still be able to harvest these rockfish species (but are encouraged to release them) and 1 cabezon a day.

Anglers may also choose to fish the offshore longleader fishery outside of the 40-fathom regulatory line, which is open year round. The longleader fishery has a daily bag limit of 10 fish made of yellowtail, widow, canary, blue, deacon, redstripe, greenstripe, silvergray, and bocaccio rockfish. No other groundfish are allowed and offshore longleader fishing trips cannot be combined with traditional bottomfish, flatfish or halibut trips.

Ocean salmon fishing is closed.

Halibut fishing is now closed.

The Friday and Saturday after Thanksgiving are Free Fishing Days in Oregon – days you don’t need a license or tag to fish, crab or clam anywhere in the state open to fishing/crabbing/clamming. (Remember, all other rules and regulations apply.)

Trout fishing on Diamond Lake has been hit and miss, but fall can be a great time to land some nice trout in the lake.

Trout and summer steelhead are both open on the upper Rogue, and fly-anglers continue to have good luck catching summer steelhead.

While the passes remain snow free, Howard Prairie, Fish Lake or Hyatt still remain great fishing opportunities for trout, especially from pontoons or a kayak.

2019 Stocking schedule and Stocking Maps

SW Washington –  From the WDF&W web site, November 19th.

For regulation updates, go HERE.

Fishery Updates

Columbia River Tributaries

Salmon/Steelhead:

Grays River – 4 bank anglers had no catch

Elochoman River – 2 bank anglers had no catch.

Cowlitz River – I-5 Br downstream – 8 bank rods had no catch. 9 boats/21 rods kept 13 coho and

released 1 Chinook.

Above the I-5 Br – 15 bank rods kept one coho and released two Chinook. 3 boats/7 rods released one

Chinook and three coho.

Kalama River – 1 bank angler had no catch.

Lewis River – 15 bank anglers released three coho. 5 boats/12 rods released one Chinook and one coho.

Washougal River – 1 bank angler had no catch.

Klickitat below Fisher Hill Bridge – 31 bank anglers kept 10 Chinook, 12 coho and released three Chinook and one coho. 4 boats/14 rods kept one Chinook and 18 coho.

Tributaries not listed: Creel checks not conducted.