Southwest Oregon Fishing Reports for Aug 2nd, 2019

Southwest Oregon Fishing Reports

From Pete Heley at PeteHeley.com

No SW fishing report from Pete this week.

From ODF&W

Ocean salmon fishing for Chinook salmon from Cape Falcon to Humbug Mt is open. The ocean opened to fin-clipped coho salmon on June 22. Chinook must be a minimum of 24-inches long and coho must be at least 16 inches. Fishing for salmon has been okay with Winchester being the most productive ports on the coast. Anglers have been averaging one fish per person. As of July 21, ocean salmon anglers have caught 30.3 percent of the fin-clipped coho quota.

The Nearshore Halibut season is open seven days a week in the Central Coast Subarea. As of July 21, there is 76 percent of the Nearshore quota remaining. As of July 20, there is still 48 percent of the Spring All-Depth quota remaining for the Central Coast. The next open All-Depth halibut days will be on Aug. 2-3. The Southern Oregon Subarea is open seven days a week for halibut. There is still 85 percent of the quota remaining for the Southern Oregon Coast halibut season.

At Winchester Bay, fishing in the Triangle and South jetty has been successful.

Bass fishing continues to be good in lakes, ponds and river throughout the Zone, including the Tenmile Lakes, the South Fork, and mainstem Umpqua and many other locations.

Look for striped bass in the lower stretches of the Smith River below Spencer Creek in the mainstem. Recent reports indicate some great fishing.

The river is open in the tidewater portions for Chinook. There should be a few lurking in the lower sections.

Bass fishing has been good on Tenmile Lakes. Anglers are catching most of the bass along the deeper weedlines and submerged trees, but are also catching a few on topwater lures in the mornings and evenings. Yellow perch fishing is picking up with anglers catching yellow perch along the edges of weedlines. Most of the fish are under 10 inches long but there are a few 12-inch plus fish being caught.

Trout fishing has slowed down on Tenmile Lakes but a few anglers are still trolling deep with wedding ring spinners.

The recreation use health advisory issued by the Oregon Health Authority on July 19 for the South Lake at Tenmile Lakes has been lifted.

Recent reports have indicated some decent fishing at some of the high Umpqua lakes. A small spinner or fly can be great choices. Contact the Forest Service at 541-496-3532 for road conditions as lakes may still be difficult to access.

Bass fishing has been good in most of the main Umpqua River. Some fall Chinook have been caught in the bay, and it should continue to improve as we get into August. Please note there is no retention of unclipped coho salmon in the river. The river regulations start at the tips of the jetties.

The Rogue above Lost Creek Reservoir will be stocked this week and this will occur weekly through the summer. Reports indicate fishing has been good from Prospect upstream and that includes one lucky angler who caught a 7-pound brown trout. With cold water, you’ll want to swing your lure right in front of fish, so work through a hole a bit more slowly.

Anglers can cast flies or smaller lures like a Panther Martin or rooster tail. Often tipping the lure with bait helps to produce. In slower holes, fishing straight bait such as night crawler or Pautzke eggs, even PowerBait will produce.

The big news on the upper Rogue is the annual closure of fishing for Chinook. Between Dodge Bridge and Cole Rivers Hatchery, the river is closed to Chinook fishing beginning Aug. 1. Anglers may continue to fish for summer steelhead and trout. The Rogue between Fishers Ferry Boat Ramp and Dodge Bridge remains open for Chinook until Sept. 1.

As of July 24, 304 new summer steelhead had entered the trap at Cole Rivers, for a season total of 920 steelhead to date. Excess hatchery adult summer steelhead from Cole River Hatchery are being recycled back into the fishery as well. The summer steelhead have red tags (spaghetti like) extending from the top of the fish near the dorsal fin. ODFW encourages anglers that catch these fish to call the upper Rogue office at 541-826-8774.

Summer steelhead are available along with some Chinook on the middle Rogue.

The Rogue bay has been slow for Chinook. Most of the fish are being caught downstream of Highway 101. Chinook numbers should continue climb through July.

The Huntley Seining Project has begun again. So far, we’ve seen adult steelhead, half-pounders, and shad. The Huntley Report can be found here: https://myodfw.com/recreation-report/fishing-report/columbia-zone.

Trout fishing should be good, especially in the upper Lost Creak Reservoir around and above the Highway 62 bridge. Trolling a wedding ring and worm combination behind an oval egg sinker is always a good bet.

Diamond Lake has been decent. Recent reports indicate most successful anglers are using flies with a quick retrieve or trolling. Others are having good success with floating bait off the bottom. If one technique isn’t working switch to something else.

Striped bass fishing is slowing down some but is still good in the Coquille River from Riverton to Bullards, with most anglers using cut bait or nightcrawlers fished with sliding sinkers on the river bottom.

The smallmouth bass bite is also good at this time in the mainstem and South Fork Coquille rivers. Smallmouth bass will bite on worms, jigs with a twister tail, crankbaits, and small spinners.

Temporary fall Chinook salmon regulations start on Aug. 1. Salmon anglers in the Coquille Basin will only be able to harvest 1 wild Chinook per day and 2 wild Chinook for the season in aggregate from all waters from Coos Basin, Coquille Basin, Sixes River, and Elk River. The Coquille River will be closed to salmon fishing upstream of Sturdivant Park Bridge (Highway 42S Bridge).

Coos River Basin – Fishing for rockfish inside the bay has been good near the submerged rock piles. Fishing is typically best near slacktide. A jig with a twister tail can be a great bait for catching rockfish.

Temporary fall Chinook salmon regulations start on Aug. 1. Salmon anglers in Coos Bay will only be able to harvest 1 wild Chinook per day and 5 wild Chinook for the season in aggregate from all waters from Coos Basin, Coquille Basin, Sixes River, and Elk River. The South Fork Coos River will be closed to salmon fishing upstream of Myrtle Tree Boat Ramp, and the Millicoma River will be closed to salmon fishing upstream of Rooke Higgins Boat Ramp.

Warmer water and lower flows have slowed trout fishing in the mainstem, but anglers willing to do a little walking can find some great cutthroat trout fishing in some of the tributaries to the Chetco.

2019 Stocking schedule and Stocking Maps